Trending February 2024 # How To Calculate Midrange (Examples, Calculator) # Suggested March 2024 # Top 4 Popular

You are reading the article How To Calculate Midrange (Examples, Calculator) updated in February 2024 on the website Flu.edu.vn. We hope that the information we have shared is helpful to you. If you find the content interesting and meaningful, please share it with your friends and continue to follow and support us for the latest updates. Suggested March 2024 How To Calculate Midrange (Examples, Calculator)

Midrange Formula (Table of Contents) 

Start Your Free Investment Banking Course

Download Corporate Valuation, Investment Banking, Accounting, CFA Calculator & others

Midrange Formula

Midrange in layman terms is the middle of any data set or the simply the average, mean of the data. A midrange is a statistical tool which is also known as the measure of center in statistics. Along with the existence of the midrange formula means, medium, average, mode, and range are also known as the measure of central tendency. The midrange of the data set is simply the value between the biggest value and the lowest value. In order to find the midrange of the data set the value is then divided by 2 after summing the lowest value present in the data set with the highest value present in the data set.

Today, In this article we will try and understand the working and the logic behind the working of the Midrange formula. And the relevance and the use of it. However, it is recommended by some statistician that in order to find the midrange of the data set we need to present the data in ascending and descending order. Since we are finding the midrange of the data set and we are picking the lowest and the highest value of the data so it is not necessary to arrange the present data in ascending and the descending order.

Midrange = (Maximum Value + Minimum Value) / 2

Examples of Midrange Formula (With Excel Template)

Let’s take an example to understand the calculation of Midrange formula in a better manner.

You can download this Midrange Template here – Midrange Template

Midrange Formula – Example #1

The daily temperature recorded in the city of Colombia Bogata is 55, 65, 67, 69, 70, 80, 81, 87, 90. We need to calculate the mid-temperature in Bogata during this period.

Solution:

Now we need to find the Midrange of the given function and how spread the data set is.

A Midrange of a given function can be calculated with the help of the following steps:-

Step 1: First, we need to find what is the maximum value in the data set. Maximum Value in the data set is calculated as

Step 2: Then we need to find what is the minimum value in the data set. Minimum Value in the data set is calculated as

Step 3: Midrange is calculated using the formula given below

Midrange = (Maximum Value + Minimum Value) / 2

Midrange = (90 + 55) / 2

Midrange = 145 / 2

Midrange = 72.5

Midrange Formula – Example #2

The test scores of Mr. Nadal recorded in the state government entrance exam of Uttar Pradesh are 28, 33, 34, 35, 42, 40, 41, 44, 45. We need to calculate the midrange value.

Solution:

Now we need to find the Midrange of the given function and how spread the data set is.

Step 1: First, we need to find what is the maximum value in the data set. Maximum Value in the data set is calculated as

Step 2: Then we need to find what is the minimum value in the data set. Minimum Value in the data set is calculated as

Step 3: Midrange is calculated using the formula given below

Midrange = (Maximum Value + Minimum Value) / 2

Midrange = (45 + 27.5) / 2

Midrange = 72.5

Midrange = 36.25

Midrange Formula – Example #3

Here is the data set with numbers 33, 39, 40, 41, 42, 48, 49, 52, 54. We need to calculate the midrange.

Solution:

Now we need to find the Midrange of the given function and how spread the data set is.

Step 1: First, we need to find what is the maximum value in the data set. Maximum Value in the data set is calculated as

Step 2: Then we need to find what is the minimum value in the data set. Minimum Value in the data set is calculated as

Step 3: Midrange is calculated using the formula given below

Midrange = (Maximum Value + Minimum Value) / 2

Midrange = (54 + 33) / 2

Midrange = 87 / 2

Midrange = 43.5

Explanation

The formula for Midrange basically the average of the data set. The Midrange is being computed as the average of the maximum and the minimum values present in the data sample corresponds to the measure of central tendency.

The midrange Formula can be computed as –

Midrange = (Maximum Value + Minimum Value) / 2

Relevance and Uses of Midrange Formula

The midrange formula of statistics is of great help when the user needs to find the midpoint of a large data set and it also provides as an alternative calculation for the measure of central tendency.

It also tells us about the maximum and the minimum range of the data set and where most of the data lie in a particular array. It is also useful it finding averages of various data sets. However, Mean is the most popular statistical formula which is used most in the industry.

The mid-range also lacks robustness, as outliers change it significantly. Indeed, it is one of the least efficient and least robust statistics.

Midrange Formula Calculator

You can use the following Midrange Calculator

Maximum Value Minimum Value Midrange Formula =   Midrange Formula = Maximum Value + Minimum Value = 2

0

+

0

= 0 2

Recommended Articles

This has been a guide to Midrange Formula. Here we discuss how to calculate Midrange along with practical examples. We also provide Midrange calculator with downloadable excel template. You may also look at the following articles to learn more –

You're reading How To Calculate Midrange (Examples, Calculator)

How To Calculate Marginal Revenue?

What is the Marginal Revenue Formula?

The marginal revenue formula can help companies calculate how much extra money they can make by selling more units of their existing products. They can use this to decide if they should produce more items of a product and how much they can earn from each additional sale.

Imagine you start a business where you earn money by creating and selling items. If you create one item and sell that one item, you will earn a particular amount. Now, if you start selling more pieces of that product, you will be able to earn a little extra money. This extra revenue is called marginal revenue. So, if you want to calculate how much extra money you can make by selling more pieces of the items, you can use the marginal revenue formula.

Start Your Free Investment Banking Course

Download Corporate Valuation, Investment Banking, Accounting, CFA Calculator & others

Marginal Revenue Formula

The formula to calculate Marginal Revenue is,

Marginal Revenue (MR) = Change in Revenue / Change in Quantity

OR

Marginal revenue (MR) = (Current Revenue – Initial Revenue) / (Current Quantity – Initial Quantity)

Change in Revenue is the difference between the current income and the initial income the company generated from product sales.

Change in Quantity is the increase or decrease in the number of units that the company sells of the product.

How Does the Formula Help?

Let’s understand how the marginal revenue formula can help businesses maximize their profits. For this, we will use a simple example of a farmer named Emma who grows grapefruits.

Emma sells one grapefruit for $3. So, when she sells two, she earns $6. Then, she decides to sell three grapefruits for $10. In this case, let us use the marginal revenue formula to see how much extra money she made by selling one more grapefruit.

Marginal revenue = change in revenue / change in quantity = (10-6)/(3-2) = 4

So, when we compare the revenue Emma earned from selling 3 grapefruits ($10) and the revenue she earned from selling 2 grapefruits ($6), we can see that she earned an extra $4. This extra money is called “marginal revenue” because it represents the change in revenue from selling one more grapefruit.

Thus, by calculating the marginal revenue, Emma can evaluate whether producing and selling more grapefruits is financially beneficial.

If the marginal revenue is higher than the cost of producing an additional grapefruit, Emma can make more profit by increasing her production. She can decide if she should allocate more resources, such as time and land, to grow additional grapefruits.

On the other hand, if the marginal revenue is lower than the cost, Emma may reconsider expanding her production. Focusing on her current production levels or exploring alternative crops might be more profitable.

Emma can make informed decisions about her grapefruit farming by analyzing the marginal revenue. She can ensure that she earns maximum profit while effectively managing resources.

How to Calculate Marginal Revenue Formula?

Here are the steps you can use to calculate the marginal revenue:

For example, if you sold 10 product units for $5 each, the total revenue would be 10 * $5 = $50.

For instance, if you increase the quantity from 10 to 13 units, you must determine the total revenue earned from selling 13 units. Let’s say the total income from selling 13 units is $65.

Thus, the change in total revenue would be $65 – $50 = $15.

For example, the change in quantity will be 13 – 11 = 3.

Thus, according to the example, the marginal revenue will result from dividing $15 by 3, which equals $5.

Examples of Marginal Revenue Formula

You can download this Marginal Revenue Formula Excel Template here – Marginal Revenue Formula Excel Template

Example #1

Steve Machine Works Pvt Ltd. manufactures office printing & Stationery items. The company is currently planning to introduce the production of a new category of pens. Currently, they are producing 400 pens and selling them at $5 each. They forecast to produce 800 pens and sell them at $10. We need to find the Marginal revenue of Steve Machine Works Pvt Ltd.

Change in revenue = Forecasted Revenue – Current Revenue

=$8,000 – $2,000 = $6,000

Change in Quantity = Forecasted Quantity – Current Quantity

Step 3: Now, we calculate Marginal Revenue using the below formula:

Marginal Revenue (MR)= Change in Revenue / Change in Quantity

= $6,000 / 400 = $15

Note: The below image explains the above marginal revenue calculation in Excel. We have added similar images for all examples in the article for your simpler understanding.

Thus, the marginal revenue of Steve Machine Works Pvt Ltd is $15.

Example #2

Francis & Sons are producing and selling commodities. Currently, they are producing 5,000 units and selling them at $140 each. However, they plan to introduce a new production line and expect to increase the current production by 50%, making it 7500. They will increase the selling price per unit by 40%, making it $196. We need to calculate the marginal revenue for Francis & Sons if they introduce the new production line.

Forecasted Revenue from Production = 7500 * 196 = $14,70,000

=7,500 – 5,000 = 2,500

Example #3

Elens Group of Companies has shown the following details:

Current Production = 1500

Current Revenue = $200,000

Forecasted Production = 3000

Forecasted Revenue = 250,000

Now we need to calculate the marginal revenue for the Elens Group of companies based on the provided data.

So, the Elens Group of Companies has a marginal revenue of $33.

Marginal Revenue Calculator

Use the following calculator for Marginal revenue formula calculations.

Change in Revenue Change in Quantity Marginal Revenue Formula   Marginal Revenue Formula = Change in Revenue = Change in Quantity

0

= 0

0

Marginal Revenue and Marginal Cost

Marginal revenue is the additional revenue or the change in revenue resulting from selling an extra unit. On the other hand, marginal cost is the additional cost or the change in cost due to producing an extra unit. Marginal revenue helps understand how producing and selling more units will affect a business’s revenue. In contrast, marginal cost helps us know how producing and selling more units will affect the business’s production cost.

Businesses can find the optimal production volume and pricing that maximizes their profitability by comparing marginal revenue and cost. If revenue exceeds cost, producing and selling more units is profitable; otherwise, if revenue is lower than cost, producing additional units may lead to lower profitability or losses.

Marginal Vs. Average Revenue

Marginal Revenue

Average Revenue

Definition It is the additional revenue companies earn from selling one more unit. It is the revenue the company earns on average for each unit they sell.

Formula Change in total revenue / Change in quantity Total revenue / Quantity sold

Interpretation It helps find the perfect level of production or pricing decisions. It helps find the average earning per unit and evaluate the profitability of the overall sales.

Importance

It helps in production planning by assessing whether increasing production volume is financially beneficial or not.

It gives an insight into the current demand for a product or service. If the revenue is positive, it indicates a growing market, while negative indicates a declining market.

It helps identify the output level that achieves the highest possible profit by comparing it to marginal cost.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Answer: Yes, marginal revenue can be zero or negative. It depends on specific situations and market conditions. In a competitive market, marginal revenue tends to be positive initially and then declines due to the downward-sloping demand curve. However, in some situations, zero or negative marginal revenue can occur.

Answer: MC or marginal cost refers to the additional cost that occurs by producing one more unit of a product or providing one more unit of service. On the other hand, MR or marginal revenue is the extra revenue you can earn by selling one more unit of a product or service.

Answer: Total revenue is the net income generated by selling goods and services, whereas marginal revenue is the increase in the revenue from selling one extra unit of product or service.

Recommended Articles

This EDUCBA article gives a detailed explanation of the marginal revenue formula. We explain the formula’s uses and relevance using the stepwise guide and comprehensive examples. You can also read the below articles to learn more

How To Calculate Indirect Costs

Definition of Indirect Costs

Start Your Free Investment Banking Course

Download Corporate Valuation, Investment Banking, Accounting, CFA Calculator & others

How to Calculate Indirect Costs?

The indirect cost for any company can be computed by using the following three simple steps:

Step 1: Firstly, it is to determine which input costs are indirect by nature for manufacturing a product or service delivery. Next, combine all these costs to arrive at the total manufacturing overhead.

Step 2: Next, calculate all the administrative and general costs that can’t be directly allocated to manufacturing the product or service delivery. Add all these costs together to arrive at the total administrative overhead.

Step 3: Finally, add together the total manufacturing overhead and administrative overhead that will eventually give the total indirect cost of the production.

Example

Given below is the example mentioned:

Let us consider a factory named XYZ Ltd that has the following information, and from the below-furnished information, the total indirect cost of production has to be calculated.

Raw material cost: $300,000

Labor wages: $150,000

Depreciation – $5,000

Repairs and maintenance – $50,000

Office electricity expense – $10,000

Salaries – $100,000

Factory supplies – $3,000

Accounting expense – $10,000

Audit expense – $5,000

Legal expense – $3,000

Total Indirect Manufacturing Overhead = Depreciation + Repairs and Maintenance + Office Electricity Expense + Salaries + Factory supplies

Total Indirect Manufacturing Overhead = $5,000 + $50,000 + $10,000 + $100,000 + $3,000

Total Indirect Manufacturing Overhead = $168,000

Again, the Total Indirect Administrative Overhead is calculated below.

Total Indirect Administrative Overhead = $10,000 + $5,000 + $3,000

Total Indirect Administrative Overhead = $18,000

A few of the abovementioned expenses are not included in the Total cost calculation because they are direct costs. Those excluded costs in the above cases comprise raw material costs and labor wages.

Finally, the Total Indirect Cost can be calculated as below,

Total Indirect Cost = Total Indirect Manufacturing Overhead + Total Indirect Administrative Overhead

Total Indirect Cost = $168,000 + $18,000

Total Indirect Cost = $186,000

Relevance and Uses of Indirect Costs

It can help companies to make significant pricing decisions. Usually, an accountant will add all the overhead costs and then allocate them based on the per-unit cost to compute the company’s overhead per product. This eventually helps a company ensure they are still making a profit on each unit, even after incorporating all the overhead costs.

Ultimately, this becomes the foundation for the product pricing strategy before setting the desired profit margin. In the case of manufacturing companies, indirect material costs include items utilized for the production of the end product, which again is not part of the finished goods inventory. Such items can be glue, plastic wraps, staples, and tapes needed in production. Even though indirect material costs may vary widely depending on the nature of operations, it is crucial to include them when calculating overhead costs. Senior management should know the actual production cost, considering all input costs necessary in the manufacturing process. Otherwise, the financial reporting and the subsequent analysis may be inaccurate.

Recommended Articles

This has been a guide to Indirect Costs. Here we discussed the concept with examples, relevance, and uses. You may also look at the following articles to learn more –

How To Calculate Time Difference In R

To calculate the time difference between two dates in R, you can use the built-in difftime() function.

For example:

date1 <- "2024-09-12 18:49:21" date2 <- "2024-03-21 10:34:07" # Time difference in days difftime(date1, date2)

Output:

Time difference of 175.3439 days

This function supports seconds, minutes, hours, days, and weeks as the time unit. But to calculate the time difference in months or years, you should rely on a library.

This is a comprehensive guide to calculating the time difference in R.

You will learn how to use the built-in difftime() function to calculate the time difference in seconds, minutes, hours, days, and weeks. Besides, you will learn how to use the lubridate library to calculate the number of months or years between two dates.

How Does the difftime() Function Work in R?

The easiest way to calculate time differences in R is by using the native difftime() function.

Here’s the basic syntax of the difftime() function in R:

difftime(time_start, time_end, units="days")

Where:

time_start is a string that represents the start date, such as “2024-05-19 11:03:43“

time_end is a string that represents the end date, such as “2024-09-25 20:19:31“

units is an optional argument that specifies the time units in which the difference is calculated. The default value is “days“.

Notice that the units are limited to seconds, minutes, hours, days, and weeks. To calculate the time difference in months or years, you need to use another solution (more about this later in this guide)

Calculating Time Differences in R

This section shows you how to use the difftime() function to calculate time differences in:

Seconds

Minutes

Hours

Days

Weeks

In addition, you learn how to use the lubridate library to calculate time differences in:

Months

Years

Let’s jump into it!

1. Calculate Time Difference in Seconds

To calculate the time difference between two dates in seconds in R:

Specify the start date.

Specify the end date.

Specify the time units as “secs“.

Call the difftime() function with these three arguments.

Here’s an example:

date1 <- "2024-09-12 18:49:21" date2 <- "2024-03-21 10:34:07" # Time difference in seconds difftime(date1, date2, units="secs")

Output:

Time difference of 15149714 secs 2. Calculate Time Difference in Minutes

To calculate the time difference between two dates in minutes:

Specify the start date.

Specify the end date.

Call the difftime() function with these three arguments.

Remember, the default time unit is minutes. This is why you don’t need to specify the time unit in the difftime() function call.

Here’s an example:

date1 <- "2024-09-12 18:49:21" date2 <- "2024-03-21 10:34:07" # Time difference in minutes difftime(date1, date2)

Output:

Time difference of 252495.2 mins 3. Calculate Time Difference in Hours

To calculate the time difference between two dates in hours:

Specify the start date.

Specify the end date.

Specify the time units as “hours“.

Call the difftime() function with these three arguments.

Here’s an example:

date1 <- "2024-09-12 18:49:21" date2 <- "2024-03-21 10:34:07" # Time difference in hours difftime(date1, date2, units="hours")

Output:

Time difference of 4208.254 hours 4. Calculate Time Difference in Days

To calculate the time difference between two dates in days:

Specify the start date.

Specify the end date.

Specify the time units as “days“.

Call the difftime() function with these three arguments.

Here’s an example:

date1 <- "2024-09-12 18:49:21" date2 <- "2024-03-21 10:34:07" # Time difference in days difftime(date1, date2, units="days")

Output:

Time difference of 175.3439 days 5. Calculate Time Difference in Weeks

To calculate the time difference between two dates in weeks in R:

Specify the start date.

Specify the end date.

Specify the time units as weeks.

Call the difftime() function with these three arguments.

Here’s an example:

date1 <- "2024-09-12 18:49:21" date2 <- "2024-03-21 10:34:07" # Time difference in weeks difftime(date1, date2, units="weeks")

Output:

Time difference of 25.04913 weeks 6. Calculate Time Difference in Months

To calculate the time difference between two dates in months in R, you cannot use the difftime() method. This is because the difftime() function’s time units only stretch to “weeks”.

But why is that?

Calculating a time difference in months or years is tricky because the notion of year or month isn’t clearly defined.

There are 28-31 days in a month.

There can be either 365 or 366 days in a year due to leap years.

You could make an assumption that a month is 30 days in length. But this would cause an issue in February. For example, the time difference between 2024-02-01 and 2024-03-01 is 29 days. This is not a whole month in the 30-day-month system even though a full month has passed!

To take into account the discrepancies in the month and year lengths, I recommend using an external library whose creator has put in the hours to make dates work right.

One great way to calculate time differences in R is by using a library lubridate.

For example, let’s use the lubridate library to count the number of whole months between two dates:

library(lubridate) first_date <- as.Date('2024-02-01') second_date <- as.Date('2024-04-01') diff <- interval(first_date, second_date) %/% months(1) diff

Output:

[1] 2

This result takes into account the 28-day-long February and correctly determines the number of whole months to be 2.

7. Calculate Time Difference in Years

When talking about time differences, a year can cause headaches. Traditionally speaking, there are 365 days in a year, while the actual number is closer to 365.25.

This fraction is important and has to be taken into account. This is why the timekeepers came up with a leap year which is a year with 366 days. The leap year is a great way to even out the extra 0.25 days but it causes a problem when calculating time differences.

For example, the time difference between two leap year dates 2024-01-01 and 2024-12-31 is 365 days. If your calculator used the number 365 as a full year, the calculator would falsely claim that a whole year has passed even though there’s still one day left.

Due to the hazy definition of year, the difftime() function cannot calculate the time difference between two dates in years.

Once again, the safest bet to calculate the number of full years between two dates is by using the lubridate library.

For example:

library(lubridate) first_date <- as.Date('2024-12-31') second_date <- as.Date('2024-01-01') diff <- interval(first_date, second_date) %/% years(1) diff

Output:

[1] 0

The lubridate library gives you the correct number of full years between two date objects.

Summary

Today you learned how to use the difftime() function in R to calculate time differences between two dates.

The R’s built-in difftime() function can calculate the time differences between two dates in:

Seconds (units=”secs”)

Minutes (units=”mins”)

Hours (units=”hours”)

Days (units=”days”)

Weeks (units=”weeks”)

But it cannot calculate time differences in:

Months

Years

To get the time difference in months or years, you need to use the lubridate library. This library comes with code that knows how to take into account the variable number of days in months and leap years.

Thanks for reading. Happy coding!

Read Also

Best Python Data Science Courses

23 Simple Ways To Increase Facebook Engagement (Free Calculator)

Facebook engagement matters because it can help extend organic reach. Engagement helps boost your News Feed placement based on the Facebook algorithm.

Plus, likes and shares expose your posts to your audience’s extended network.

Ultimately, engagement indicates that your audience is, well, engaged. And an engaged audience that wants to interact with your brand is something every marketer should aim for.

Bonus: Use our free engagement rate calculator to find out your engagement rate 4 ways fast. Calculate it on a post-by-post basis or for an entire campaign — for any social network.

Facebook engagement is any action someone takes on your Facebook Page or one of your posts.

1. Teach, entertain, inform, or inspire

Your Facebook audience is not looking for a sales pitch, and they’re certainly not going to engage with one.

They want to engage with content that will make them smile, make them think or improve their lives in some way.

Plant delivery company Plantsome doesn’t just post product pics, it shares lifestyle inspiration photos, too.

BRB ✌️ new WFH situation.Would you ever leave if your patio looked as good as @my_hygge_my_home

Posted by Plantsome on Monday, June 28, 2023

2. Get to know your audience

But here’s the thing: what you find entertaining or inspiring is not always relevant.

When you’re seeking engagement, it’s the wants and needs of your audience that matter.

And it’s tricky to understand what those wants and needs are unless you really understand who your audience is.

Facebook Page Insights provides a ton of useful information about your audience. Study this information carefully, and look for any unexpected details that could help you create a more meaningful connection with fans.

3. Keep it short

The vast majority of people use Facebook on their mobile devices—a whopping 98.3 percent of users.

Two sentences and a photo are all that this Vancouver music venue needed for their post. Keep your post short and sweet to capture attention quickly and entice users to stop scrolling and engage.

Thanks Amazon Music and Canadian Live Music Association for celebrating the love of live music with us! Check out the…

Posted by Fox Cabaret on Friday, July 9, 2023

4. Focus on quality

With people moving through content quickly, there’s no time for sub-par graphics, videos or text.

If you’re running out of original content to post, content curation can be a great way to share quality, informative content that gets your audience excited.

Pantone mixes things up by sharing colorful photography from shutterbugs every so often… like this lollipop pic.

Pops of color by Adam Hillman 🍭

Posted by Pantone on Thursday, July 1, 2023

Quality doesn’t have to be complicated, or expensive. In fact, Facebook recommends keeping things simple with a consistent color scheme and recognizable images.

5. Be relatable and human

Whether it’s sharing some behind-the-scenes content, presenting some honest and vulnerable emotions, standing up for your values or sharing a funny meme that acknowledges relatable experience, audiences are hungry for authenticity.

The UEFA football organization doesn’t just post about the excitement of the game or hot pics of soccer players: it celebrates the real volunteers working outside of the spotlight to help make their tournaments happen.

👏 𝗩𝗼𝗹𝘂𝗻𝘁𝗲𝗲𝗿 𝗮𝗽𝗽𝗿𝗲𝗰𝗶𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗽𝗼𝘀𝘁. 👏We’re immensely proud of our team of volunteers across the 11 UEFA EURO 2023 host…

Posted by UEFA on Friday, July 9, 2023

Don’t be afraid to get a little intimate or raw with your content — in some cases, being overly polished can actually feel cold.

6. Use (great) images

Facebook posts that include a photo see higher-than-average engagement rates. Simple shots work well. Facebook suggests a product close-up or a customer photo.

Candle brand Paddywax posts a mix of product shots and lifestyle shots, but everything is well lit, well framed and visually striking.

Ok call us crazy, but we kinda think yellow is the most underrated color? Especially when it’s surrounded by other bright colors and filled with Paddywax fragrance!

Posted by Paddywax Candles on Wednesday, June 9, 2023

You don’t need a fancy camera or photography equipment—your mobile phone is all you need to get started. This guide to taking better Instagram photos has tips that are just as applicable to Facebook.

If you’re not confident in your photography skills, or you’d simply like to use photos taken by professionals, stock photography is a great option. Check out our list of free stock photo sites to find some great photo resources for your next post.

7. Make a video or broadcast live

Video posts see even higher engagement than photo posts. Like photography, videography can be simple and inexpensive, and you can get started using your mobile phone.

Even a short, atmospheric video like this one from Glossier can catch the eye of a rampant scroller.

Facebook Live videos see the highest engagement of all, so incorporate a real-team broadcast (ideally with dogs involved, like this Helping Hounds Dog Rescue example) into your social strategy every once in a while.

Keep in mind that vertical video gives you the most screen real estate on mobile devices.

Importantly, Facebook’s algorithm prioritizes native videos, so you’ll get the best results when you upload your vids directly to the site, instead of sharing a link.

8. Ask a question

How do you [complete this action]?

Why do you [like this event or brand]?

Do you agree with [a notable statement, event, person, etc.]?

What’s your favorite [fill in the blank]?

Burger King asked fans to help name its sourdough starter in a caption to this video. (Still waiting for them to choose an answer but we like “Glen.”)

You could also ask fans for information about what kind of content they want to see from you. Then, give them what they ask for. This targeted content will inspire even more engagement.

9. Respond to fans

10. Test and measure everything

You know how the saying goes about what happens when you assume. On Facebook, there are tons of opportunities to learn what your fans like, and what they don’t.

The statistics say that video posts get the most engagement, but that might not be true for your particular brand. Or maybe your followers just can’t get enough 360-degree video.

Testing is such an important part of refining any marketing strategy that we’ve created a whole guide to show you how to do it right. Check out our step-by-step instructions on how to use social media for A/B testing.

Analytics is such an important part of the testing process. After all, if you’re not measuring how those tests are going… what was the point? Here are four tools to use to collect that sweet, sweet Facebook data to know—quantitatively speaking—what’s working best.

11. Post consistently and at the right times

To find out the best times to post on Facebook, learn when your audience is active using Page Insights:

Of course, that doesn’t mean you need to get up in the middle of the night to post on Facebook. This is a great reason to schedule Facebook posts using a social media management tool.

The most important thing is to post consistently, so your audience comes to expect to see content from you regularly. Testing will help you determine how often you should post to get the best response from fans, but social media experts recommend posting at least two or three times per week.

12. Drive traffic from other sources

People who are already interacting with you on other channels are a great source of potential engagement. Make sure they know where to find you on Facebook.

Try adding a link to your Page on other social networks. Link to Facebook from your website and email signature — many companies (like The Cut) do this at the bottom of their website, or on their “About” page.

Include a Facebook plugin on your blog to highlight your latest posts, or embed a Facebook post directly in a blog post.

Don’t forget about offline materials. Include your Facebook Page URL on your business cards, posters at events and packing slips.

13. Get active in Facebook groups

Creating a Facebook group is a great way to get fans involved and engaged. More than 1.8 billion people use Facebook groups. And those meaningful interactions in groups can create brand loyalty and lead to increased engagement on your Facebook Page.

Mixed Makeup has a private group for fans to share skincare tips and ask beauty questions — with over 64,000 members, it’s a great example of community building.

Joining other relevant Facebook groups is also a great way to connect with fellow entrepreneurs and thought leaders in your industry.

14. Use Facebook Stories

Like Instagram Stories, Facebook Stories appear at the very top of the News Feed. That’s great placement for drawing eyeballs to your content — especially considering that 500 million people use Facebook stories daily.

This informal way of sharing content allows you to post as often as you like, without worrying about overwhelming your fans’ News Feeds. And since people expect production quality to be lower on Stories, you can be more personal and in-the-moment to build a stronger personal connection with followers.

Source: 20×200

15. Add a call-to-action button

Your CTA button can ask viewers to:

Book an appointment

Contact you (including through Facebook Messenger)

Watch a video

Shop your products or see your offers

Download your app or play your game

Visit and join your Facebook group

16. Get verified

People want to know who they’re talking to online. This applies to brands, too. A verified badge shows visitors that you’re the real deal and they can feel safe engaging with your posts.

We can trust that anything this Showtime account, for example, is coming directly from the network. (Thank goodness! No lies about Ziwe over here!)

After all, no one wants to be the one to like or share a post from a fake Page misrepresenting a brand.

17. Avoid engagement bait

When you’re hoping for likes and shares, it might be tempting to ask for likes and shares. Don’t do it! Facebook considers this engagement bait and will penalize you by downranking your posts in the Facebook algorithm.

Source: Facebook

18. Boost your Facebook posts

Want more details? Check out our full guide to using the Facebook Boost Post button.

19. Join a trending conversation

Piggybacking on major events or trending hashtags is a great way to diversify your Facebook content and show that your brand has some range.

Speaking of pigs: even Peppa was getting in on the trending Suez Canal news when that was the hot topic of internet gossip.

Fortunately, Mr Bull was available this weekend. 👷‍♂️#Evergiven #suezcanal

Posted by Peppa Pig on Monday, March 29, 2023

20. Get a little help from your friends (or employees, or influencers)

When people share your content, that’s a hint to Facebook that this is the good stuff. So encouraging your team, family or friends to share your posts with their own network doesn’t just get you in front of their followers: it helps boost you in the newsfeed for everyone.

21. Run contests

Surprise! People love free stuff. Giveaways and competitions are a great way to get people excited to engage and follow your Page. Check out our tips for running a successful Facebook contest here.

That being said, Facebook does have some regulations around contests on its site (and your region or country might, too!) so make sure to familiarize yourself with the rules before you start handing out the grand prizes.

Want to win one of five $100 The Body Shop e-gift cards? Head on over to our Instagram account…

Posted by The Body Shop on Thursday, July 8, 2023

22. Scope out the competition

Keeping an eye on what your nemesis is up to is a way to make sure you’re not left behind or missing out on something that’s working well.

Setting up a stream in your Hootsuite dashboard to monitor industry Pages or search for industry hashtags or topics is a great way to keep yourself in the loop about what competitors are up to.

23. Repackage successful content

If a post worked well, don’t just pat yourself on the back and call it a day… start brainstorming about how you can repackage that winning content and get a bit more out of it.

For instance, if a how-to video is a hit, can you spin a blog post out of that? Or repost a link with a brand new photo and a compelling question?

Of course, you’ll want to spread those posts out — maybe by a few weeks — so it’s not obvious you’re repeating yourself.

#1 Analytics Tool for Growth

Beautiful reports. Clear data. Actionable insights to help you grow faster.

Start free 30-day trial

Use the calculator below to find out your Facebook engagement rate by post.

Note: If you’re calculating your account’s total engagement, include information about all your posts (e.g total number of posts published, total number of likes, and so on). If you’re calculating the engagement rate of a specific campaign, only include the details of the posts that were part of the campaign.

Engagement rate calculator

Number of followers

Number of posts

Comments

Shares

Likes

Saves

DMs

Or, better yet, start a free 30-day Hootsuite trial to easily track the performance of all your social channels in one place (so you can replicate what works and get more engagement). Hootsuite Analytics collects your stats from Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, and TikTok.

With Hootsuite Analytics, you can also:

Find out when your audience is online

Get personalized recommendations for your best times to post for each of your accounts

Easily view industry benchmarks and see how you compare to competitors

Try for free for 30 days

If you prefer manual math (why???), read on for the exact formula:

Your Facebook engagement rate measures the amount of interaction your content earns relative to your followers or reach.

In other words, it shows the percentage of people who saw your post and engaged with it.

Depending on your social media goals, there are a few different ways to get to that number. You can calculate your Instagram engagement rate by impressions, posts, reach, or followers.

Engagement rate = (Interactions / Audience) x 100

Manage your Facebook presence alongside your other social media channels using Hootsuite. From a single dashboard, you can schedule posts, share video, engage your audience, and measure the impact of your efforts. Try it free today.

Get Started

Grow your Facebook presence faster with Hootsuite. Schedule all your social posts and track their performance in one dashboard.

Examples, Working, Methods, How To Use?

What is a React Bootstrap

Start Your Free Software Development Course

Web development, programming languages, Software testing & others

Working with Methods of Adding Bootstrap in React

With the help of packages.

With the help of Bootstrap dependency installation.

With the help of Bootstrap CDN.

1. Adding bootstrap in react with help of bootstrap packages

To include Bootstrap in React, there are 2 methods:

react-bootstrap

reactstrap

Example with react-bootstrap:

The below example focuses on addition using react-bootstrap:

It is installed with npm:

npm install –save react-bootstrap

Our chúng tôi file includes:

import "bootstrap/dist/css/bootstrap.min.css";

Once we install the package, the components can be used in any components file.

Components inside the public folder:

index.html

Components inside the src folder:

AOC folder

App.css

App.js

Menu.js

index.js

styles.css

Components inside the AOC folder:

AboutUS.js

AboutUSdescriptive.js

a. index.html

b. AboutUS.js

Code:

import React , { Component } from "react"; import { Jumbotron , Button } from "react-bootstrap"; import { Link } from "react-router-dom"; export default class PasoAOCInicio extends Component { constructor() { super(); this.state = { name: "React" }; } render() { return ( EDUCBA is a best platform for online training and video courses. We provide trainings related to latest emerging technologies. We help in building up the careers of professionals into these emerging fields. <Button variant="primary" to="/AOC/pasoAOCDatosIdentificativos" as={Link} > ); } }

c. AboutUsdescriptive.js

Code:

import React , { Component } from "react"; import { Button } from "react-bootstrap"; import { Link } from "react-router-dom"; export default class PasoAOCDatosIdentificativos extends Component { constructor() { super(); this.state = { name: "React" }; } render() { return ( <Button variant="primary" to="/AOC/pasoAOCDatosIdentificativos" as={Link} > ); } }

d. App.css

e. App.js

Code:

import React , { useState } from "react"; import { Row , Col } from "react-bootstrap"; import { HashRouter as Router , Route , Redirect } from "react-router-dom"; import PasoAOCInicio from "./AOC/AboutUS.js"; import PasoAOCDatosIdentificativos from "./AOC/AboutUsdescriptive.js"; import Menu from "./Menu"; import "bootstrap/dist/css/bootstrap.min.css"; import "./App.css"; <Route path="/AOC/pasoAOCDatosIdentificativos" component={PasoAOCDatosIdentificativos} ); export default App;

f. Menu.js

Code:

import React from "react"; import Navbar from "react-bootstrap/Navbar"; import Nav from "react-bootstrap/Nav"; import { NavLink } from "react-router-dom"; About Us Contact Info ); export default Menu;

g. index.js

Code:

import React from "react"; import ReactDOM from "react-dom"; import HashRouter from "react-router-dom/HashRouter"; import Container from "react-bootstrap/Container"; import App from "./App"; ReactDOM.render( document.getElementById("root") );

h. styles.css

Code:

.App { font-family: 'Times New Roman', Times, serif; text-align: center; }

Output:

Example with reactstrap

The below example focuses on addition using reactstrap:

It is installed with npm:

npm install -g create-react-app

Our chúng tôi file includes:

import "bootstrap/dist/css/bootstrap.css";

Once we install reactstrap package, the reactstrap components can be used in any components file.

Components inside the public folder:

index.html

Components inside the src folder:

BadgeList folder

Breadcrumb folder

ButtonList folder

Dropdown folder

ListGroup folder

AlertList.jsx

index.js

Components inside BadgeList folder:

index.jsx

Components inside the Breadcrumb folder:

index.jsx

styles.css

Components inside ButtonList folder:

index.jsx

styles.css

Components inside the Dropdown folder:

indexxjsx

Components inside ListGroup folder:

index.jsx

styles.css

a. chúng tôi (in BadgeList folder)

Code:

import React from "react"; import { Badge } from "reactstrap"; return ( Blog What is EDUCBA? ); }; export default BadgeList;

b. chúng tôi (in Breadcrumb folder)

Code:

import React from "react"; import { Breadcrumb , BreadcrumbItem } from "reactstrap"; import "bootstrap/dist/css/bootstrap.css"; import "./styles.css"; const styles = { marginBottom: "21px" }; return ( ); }; export default Bread;

Code:

.breadcrumb { background-color: opaque; }

d. chúng tôi (in ButtonList folder)

Code:

import React from "react"; import { Button } from "reactstrap"; import "bootstrap/dist/css/bootstrap.css"; import "./styles.css"; return ( Software Development Excel Design EDUCBA ); }; export default ButtonList;

e. chúng tôi (in ButtonList folder)

Code:

.btn-success { background-color: #f082ff; }

f. chúng tôi (in Dropdown folder)

Code:

import React from "react"; import { Dropdown , DropdownToggle , DropdownMenu , DropdownItem } from "reactstrap"; import "bootstrap/dist/css/bootstrap.css"; export default class DropdownComponent extends React.Component { constructor(props) { super(props); this.toggle = this.toggle.bind(this); this.state = { dropdownOpen: false }; } toggle() { this.setState({ dropdownOpen: !this.state.dropdownOpen }); } render() { return ( ); } }

g. chúng tôi (in ListGroup folder)

Code:

import React from "react"; import { ListGroup , ListGroupItem } from "reactstrap"; import "./styles.css"; return ( ); }; export default Listgroup;

h. chúng tôi (in ListGroup folder)

Code:

.list-group { margin: 31px 0; } a.list-group-item { font-weight: 601; } .list-group-item::before { content: "▶︎"; display: inline-block; padding-right: 9px; font-size: 13px; line-height: 2; }

i. chúng tôi (in src folder)

Code:

import React from "react"; import { Alert } from "reactstrap"; return ( ); }; export default AlertList;

j. chúng tôi (in src folder)

Code:

import React from "react"; import ReactDOM from "react-dom"; import ButtonList from "./ButtonList"; import BadgeList from "./BadgeList"; import AlertList from "./AlertList"; import Listgroup from "./ListGroup"; import Bread from "./Breadcrumb"; import DropdownComponent from "./Dropdown"; const styles = { margin: "21px" }; return ( ); };

k. chúng tôi (in public folder)

Code:

To run this kindly enable JavaScript.

Output:

2. Adding bootstrap in react with help of dependency installation

It is installed with npm:

npm install bootstrap npm install jquery popper.js

Our chúng tôi file includes:

import "../node_modules/bootstrap/dist/css/bootstrap.min.css";

Now let’s code:

index.html

Components inside the src folder:

components folder

index.js

styles.css

Components inside the components folder:

templates folder

HelloWorld.js

Components inside templates folder:

HelloWorldHtml.jsx

a. HelloWorldHtml.jsx

Code:

import React from "react"; return ( ); };

b. HelloWorld.js

Code:

import React, { Component } from "react"; import { HelloWorldHtml } from "./templates/HelloWorldHtml.jsx"; class HelloWorld extends Component { render() { } } export default HelloWorld;

c. index.js

Code:

import React from "react"; import ReactDOM from "react-dom"; import bootstrap from "bootstrap"; import "../node_modules/bootstrap/dist/css/bootstrap.min.css"; import HelloWorld from "./components/HelloWorld"; function App() { return ( ); } const rootElement = document.getElementById("root");

d. styles.css

e. index.html

Code:

<meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1, shrink-to-fit=no"

3. Adding bootstrap in react with the help of CDN

Hello.js

index.html

index.js

a. chúng tôi Code:

import React from 'react';

b. index.html

Code:

To run this please enable JavaScript.

c. index.js

Code:

import React from 'react'; import { render } from 'react-dom'; import Hello from './Hello'; const styles = { fontFamily: 'times', textAlign: 'center', }; class App extends React.Component { render() { return ( ); } }

Output:

Conclusion

On the basis of the above article, we saw how to use it and the different methods to use it. We went through different examples to understand its works and how to use it according to the different requirements of the website.

Recommended Articles

This is a guide to React Bootstrap. Here we discuss the introduction and working methods of adding bootstrap in react respectively. You may also have a look at the following articles to learn more –

Update the detailed information about How To Calculate Midrange (Examples, Calculator) on the Flu.edu.vn website. We hope the article's content will meet your needs, and we will regularly update the information to provide you with the fastest and most accurate information. Have a great day!