Trending February 2024 # Broadcast Video Streams On Linux With Open Broadcaster # Suggested March 2024 # Top 4 Popular

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For the longest time streaming has been nearly impossible to do on Linux. Sure, you could use a hacky FFMPEG script to get it done, but nobody who’s not incredibly savvy with that kind of thing could ever accomplish this.

Look no further. Open Broadcaster, a professional grade streaming software, is finally available on Linux. With it you can broadcast to many different streaming services with many different types of video and audio effects.

Installing Open Broadcaster

Before OBS can be used, it needs to be installed. If you’re a Ubuntu user, simply enter the following commands in a terminal window, and you’ll be up and running in no time.

sudo

add-apt-repository ppa:kirillshkrogalev

/

ffmpeg-next

sudo

add-apt-repository ppa:obsproject

/

obs-studio

sudo

apt-get update

sudo

apt-get install

ffmpeg

 obs-studio

If you’re using another Linux distribution, don’t worry! The OBS project has you covered. Just go here and follow the instructions on how to get the program working for your Linux-based operating system of choice.

Configuring Open Broadcaster

To stream, you’ll need to provide your credentials from the streaming service you’ll be using to broadcasting. OBS supports Twitch, YouTube, DailyMotion and many others.

Inside Output, you’ll see a drop-down menu with the option “Simple” selected. Leave it at this as the simple settings available will be all you will need. In most cases the streaming service you’re using won’t have much configuration necessary (and if they do, they’ll give you directions to follow).

Streaming with Open Broadcaster

Now that your streaming service has been logged in and configured, and your video output is set correctly, it’s time to stream some video. So how do you do it? It’s easy! Go to the main OBS window, and use the Sources tool to add items to your stream (cameras, video clips, pictures, etc.).

Conclusion

Streaming easily on Linux has always been a challenge. Having Open Broadcaster on Linux is a huge step towards solving that issue and making it a legitimate platform. Cross another thing off the list that Linux can do just as well as Windows and Mac.

The best thing about OBS is how easy it is to use. There are professional tools out there, ones that cost a lot of money and are harder to get going than this program. It’s uncanny, to say the least.

Have you used Open Broadcaster on Linux? What are your thoughts? Let us know below!

Derrik Diener

Derrik Diener is a freelance technology blogger.

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Convert Video To Audio On Android With Mp3 Video Converter

Sure, you can easily do this using several tools available on all the major desktop operating systems, but why not save some time and make your conversions directly on your Android device?

In this guide I’ll show you how to convert video to audio on Android using an app called “MP3 Video Converter”.

Installation

MP3 Video converter can be installed from the Google Play Store just like most other applications.

Features

MP3 Video Converter has a straight forward, no-nonsense interface with only the necessary options.

It supports a couple of video formats including MP4, FLV and 3GP. It can convert to just MP3 or AAC audio formats, though.

Usage

To make your conversion, simply select the video file from your file manager,

then choose your preferred audio format (mp3 or AAC).

You can also change the bit rate if you want to convert to MP3,

Then add any other information about the audio file such as the title, artist and album.

Finally, select the directory where you want the converted video file to be storedm, then hit Convert.

Your conversion will start immediately and may take some time depending on the size and length of the video file.

Once done, you will get a notification on your device and can play the audio file using your preferred music player.

Conclusion

That’s all there is to converting video to audio on Android. I have used the application for several months now, and it just works for me everytime. Feel free to try it out, and let us know if it works for you, too.

Ayo Isaiah

Ayo Isaiah is a freelance writer from Lagos who loves everything technology with a particular interest in open-source software. Follow him on Twitter.

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How To Create A Broadcast Channel On Instagram

Instagram offers a bunch of different ways to share pictures, videos, and thoughts on the platform. If you’re a creator on Instagram, you can share a post on your profile, create a story for the day, share short-form reels, and even go live with your followers. To help you establish a better bond with your audience, Instagram now provides creators with a new option called Broadcast channels which as the name aptly says lets you broadcast messages and other content to people who follow you. 

In this post, we’ll explain what Broadcast Channels are all about, how you can create one, and invite people to it. 

What are Broadcast Channels on Instagram

To offer creators a way to interact with their followers more conveniently, Instagram has added a new tool – Broadcast channels to its platform. The tool is designed to help creators reach their followers and form deeper connections with them by offering a one-to-many messaging service that will be available publicly for anyone who follows the creator. 

This way, creators can share their latest updates, event details, future collaborations, and behind-the-scenes moments with their followers via texts, photos, videos, and voice notes. Creators will also be able to create polls that others can vote on as feedback. 

Although broadcast channels are public and can be discovered by anyone on Instagram, only people who follow a creator can join their channel. Likewise, the content that’s shared on these broadcast channels will only be available to people who follow the creator and won’t be visible on their public profile.

When a broadcast channel is created, only the creator of the channel can send messages for their followers to see. Their followers cannot send messages inside this channel but can react to the content shared and vote on their polls.

If you follow a creator and they create a broadcast channel, you will receive a one-time notification when they send the first message inside it. From there, you will only receive future notifications when you join the channel. 

What do you need to create a Broadcast Channel

To use a Broadcast Channel on your account, you need to meet some requirements:

Broadcast Channels are only available in the US, for now. Support for other regions should arrive in the coming months. 

Broadcast Channels can only be created using the Instagram app on Android or iOS. It’s not available on the web version of Instagram. 

How to create a Broadcast Channel on Instagram

If you’ve met the aforementioned requirements, you can create a Broadcast Channel on Instagram directly from the Instagram app. To get started, open Instagram on your iPhone or Android device. 

Inside Instagram, tap on the Inbox icon at the top right corner. This icon will either be marked with an arrow sign or may resemble that of the Facebook Messenger logo.  

This will open the Direct Messages screen on your account. Here, tap on the compose icon (marked with a pencil sign surrounded by a square) at the top right corner. 

On the next screen, tap on Create broadcast channel. 

From here, you can enter the name of your broadcast channel, choose the audience type, and whether or not you want the channel to appear inside your profile. Once you’ve entered all the details, tap on Create broadcast channel at the bottom to proceed. 

When you’re inside the newly created channel, you can send text messages and share photos, videos, and voice notes with your followers on the channel. 

How to invite people to your Broadcast Channel

Once a broadcast channel is created, the next step is to invite people to join your channel. There are three ways to invite people to your broadcast channel – by sending the first message inside your channel, sharing channel invite links, and adding the channel to your Instagram Story. 

Method 1: Send first messages inside a broadcast channel 

When you create a broadcast channel on Instagram, it will be publicly accessible to anyone on Instagram but others wouldn’t know unless they view your public profile. The easiest way to invite your followers to join your channel is by sending your first message inside a broadcast channel. When you send this message, all of your followers will receive a one-time notification asking them to join your channel. 

To send a message inside your broadcast channel, open the Instagram app on iOS or Android. Inside Instagram, tap on the Inbox icon at the top right corner of the screen. 

When your Instagram DMs open, select Channels at the top of the screen. 

On the next screen, tap on the broadcast channel you just created. 

You’ll now arrive at the broadcast channel screen. Here, tap on the Messages box at the bottom and type your first message inside the channel. This announcement message will be visible to everyone who follows you as they’ll receive a notification about the channel for the very first time.

Once you’ve typed the welcome message, tap on Send at the bottom right corner. 

The message you created will be sent inside the broadcast channel. All of your followers will now receive a one-time notification to join your channel.

Method 2: Share channel link with others 

Another way you can invite people to your channel is by using the invite link available inside your broadcast channel. You can share the link that’s generated for your channel on your Instagram profile or other social media platforms to reach a wider audience. 

To share a link to your broadcast channel, open the Instagram app on iOS or Android. Inside Instagram, tap on the Inbox icon at the top right corner of the screen. 

You’ll now arrive at the broadcast channel screen. Here, scroll to the top of the channel and tap on Copy link. 

The link to your broadcast channel will now be copied onto your device clipboard and you can paste it and share it with people on other platforms. 

Method 3: Add channel to your Instagram Story

You can also invite people who view your public content on Instagram to your broadcast channel by sharing the channel to your Instagram story. For this, open the Instagram app on iOS or Android. Inside Instagram, tap on the Inbox icon at the top right corner of the screen. 

On the next screen, tap on the broadcast channel you just created. 

On the next screen, you’ll be able to add a background to your Instagram story alongside your broadcast channel invite which appears as a sticker on the screen.

When the story is ready to be shared, you can upload it by selecting Your story and then tapping on the right arrow icon at the bottom right corner of the screen. 

How to join someone’s broadcast channel

You can join someone’s broadcast channel from the notification you received when this person created the channel for the first time or by using the channel link they shared on their profile or story. If you follow the person whose channel you want to join, you will automatically receive a one-time notification with a Join channel button.

If you don’t follow the person whose broadcast channel you want to join, you can access their channel from the channel link they may have shared on their Instagram story, bio, or from their posts on other social media.

When you access the channel link on your phone, you will be taken to their broadcast channel. You can tap on Join broadcast channel at the bottom of the screen to access all the messages and media they’ve shared on the channel. 

When you become a part of someone’s broadcast channel, this channel will be visible alongside all of your existing messages and group chats on your Instagram inbox. 

How to delete a broadcast channel from Instagram

On the next screen, swipe leftwards on the broadcast channel you want to remove on the iPhone. On Android, tap and hold on the channel to get additional options.  

In the options that appear on the screen, tap on Delete. 

To confirm your action, tap on Delete in the prompt that appears. 

The broadcast channel will be removed from your account and will disappear from the inboxes of people who were part of your channel. 

That’s all you need to know about creating broadcast channels on Instagram. 

Images source: Instagram

Another New Twist On Open

There’s a feeling of inexhaustible energy radiating through the world of open-source VoIP. And the more we learn, the more we discover.

We recently had the opportunity to speak with Marc Fribush, president and COO of newly fledged service provider Aretta Communications, and got the lowdown on NetPBX, this organization’s vision of phone service for small companies.

While Aretta’s offerings—like those of some other young companies we’ve covered recently—are based on the now-mature and venerable Asterisk PBX, this provider’s platform and service package have some striking differences.

Like some others, the NetPBX service is hosted, requiring no customer premise equipment beyond IP phones (although Aretta recommends the use of a QoS-enabled router). But unique to NetPBX (in our experience) is that it runs on a virtualization platform (SWsoft’s Virtuozzo), which creates separate sessions for each customer, each with its own memory and disk space.

As Fribush and his founding partner, now-CEO Michael Rand, were first pondering the realities of open-source PBX software and implementing their first Asterisk system on an old cast-off PC out of the basement, they realized that this was probably pretty typical of Asterisk deployments—and “not the ideal environment.”

“We thought, ‘There’s got to be a better way!’ ” Fribush told chúng tôi “And the idea came to us ‘Why not push this entire open-source IP PBX that’s typically run on the premise, up onto the network cloud? Push it into a telco hotel in a real data center, with the real EPS power backup and phenomenal bandwidth connections to the Internet?’ ”

And that’s what they have done.

NetPBX service is priced, not per extension—as is typical in the hosted VoIP business—but by the maximum number of simultaneous calls the account is provisioned for (i.e., the number of lines).

A two-line deployment is $29.95 per month, though Firbush told us “That’s really more of a test playground system. If you’re really not sure whether you want to dive in, you can purchase that one and go ahead and make a few test calls.” The four-line offering—at $39.95 a month—is designed for a small office with a handful of employees. By the time you get to an eight-line deployment ($59.95), you’re providing phone for up to a dozen.

See the complete pricing scheme here.

Not only do customers get to pick a plan, they get their choice of three different Asterisk implementations, trixbox (formerly known as Asterisk@home), Elastix (another enhanced version with user-friendly tools and interface), and what they’re calling Kris’ Virtual Asterisk, a version developed by Aretta’s director of operations, Kris Sheets, and optimized for virtualization.

Whatever implementation a customer chooses, Aretta overlays its own “enhanced security add-ons” and provides proactive monitoring and alerting. And in case customers are reluctant to configure their own PBXs (despite the greatly improved user interfaces these implementations offer), Aretta will gather the necessary information and pre-configure the account for a modest fee.

Two more components complete Aretta’s service offering: SIP trunking (connectivity to/from the PSTN) and phones.

According to Fribush, they discovered almost from day one that everyone who called to sign up wanted/needed trunking. “They could go to [a third party provider] and pick up trunking, and somehow try and integrate that,” he said. “But it really made sense to put it together as one bundled offering, all integrated seamlessly together.”

Outbound PSTN calling to the “lower 48 states” is 1.39 cents per minute. For inbound, Aretta offers DID phone numbers in over 6,000 rate centers across the U.S.—at ridiculously low prices. Inbound regular calls are 1.39 cents per minute. Toll-free inbound runs 2.49 cents a minute.

As for phones, Aretta supplies (via drop-ship arrangement) a variety of Polycom products—with other brands to come—which they sell at competitive prices. “All of the phones you get from us are preconfigured,” Fribush explained. “When you get them out of the box, you simply plug them in and they will automatically go and download their configuration from our provisioning server, and then register themselves to your host PBX.”

As for the response, so far (NetPBX was officially announced just over a month ago)? “It’s hard to describe,” Fribush told chúng tôi “Every person that calls in on the phone, they absolutely love it. They can’t find another offering like it . . .  and nobody has anything bad to say about it. In my businesses before, you always get a lot of rejections; people—for one reason or another—just don’t like your product offering. We haven’t had one rejection.”

This article was first published on chúng tôi

How To Use Lsof Command In Linux To List Open Files

The good thing about Linux is that you can easily view and manage everything, from the boot process to the installation of software packages. Here we discuss how you can use the lsof command in Linux to view open files and the processes using them. Knowing how to view this can help you understand how the system works and even take the necessary actions for specific processes.

Lsof Command

To view open files and the users or processes responsible for them, we use the lsof utility. By default, lsof is pre-installed in most distributions.

However, if you do not have it installed, you can use the package manager to install it on your system.

Debian/Ubuntu

On Debian, run the command:

sudo

apt-get install

lsof Arch/Manjaro

On Manjaro and other Arch-based distributions, use pacman by running the command:

sudo

pacman

-S

lsof CentOS/REHL/Fedora

For CentOS and the REHL family, you can use dnf:

sudo

dnf

install

lsof Use lsof Command to List Open Files for a Linux Process

Like most Linux commands, the lsof utility is incredibly simple to use. Start by typing the command lsof:

sudo

lsof

Once you run the command above, lsof should return information about the open files in the system.

COMMAND PID TID TASKCMD USER FD TYPE DEVICE SIZE

/

OFF NODE NAME init

1

root cwd DIR

8

,

48

4096

2

/

init

1

root rtd DIR

8

,

48

4096

2

/

init

1

root txt REG

0

,

19

632048

281474976743906

/

init init

1

root 0u CHR

1

,

3

0t0

15362

/

dev

/

null init

1

root 1u CHR

1

,

3

0t0

15362

/

dev

/

null init

1

root 2u CHR

1

,

3

0t0

15362

/

dev

/

null init

1

root 3w CHR

1

,

11

0t0

15367

/

dev

/

kmsg init

1

root 4u sock

0

,

8

0t0

22689

protocol: AF_VSOCK init

1

root 5r REG

0

,

4

0

4026532185

mnt init

1

root 6r REG

0

,

4

0

4026532201

mnt init

1

root 7r DIR

8

,

48

4096

240

/

home

/

cap init

1

root 8u DIR

8

,

48

4096

2

/

init

1

root 9u sock

0

,

8

0t0

21853

protocol: AF_VSOCK

Note: if you have sudo privileges, run the command with sudo to avoid “permission denied” errors on specific files.

As shown in the output above, the lsof output has the following columns:

ColumnRepresentationCommandShows the name of the process using the target file.PIDThe unique identifier for the process using the file.TIDThe column shows the thread identifier.TASKCMDThe name of the task command.USERUsername or UID of the user running the process.FDFile descriptor of the file and modes.TYPENode associated with the target file.DEVICEDevice number separated by chúng tôi size in bytes of file offset sizeNODEInode value of the local file. You can use the stat command to show inode information for the file.NAMEMount point of the file.

Now that you understand what the contents of the lsof command printout represent, let us use the command to filter for specific information.

How to Filter for Specific Process

To filter for only specific files opened by the specific process, we can use either the process name or the PID value.

For example, to show files used by the firefox process, we can use the command:

sudo

lsof

-c

firefox

The command will show all the files opened by the firefox process.

To filter by process ID, we can use the -p option and pass the process ID. You can use the top command to get the process ID of the target process.

For example, to get the PID of the firefox process, we can use the command:

sudo

lsof

-p

2121

The above command will print the files opened by the process with the PID specified.

How to Filter for a Specific User

To view only the files opened by a specific user, we can use the -u flag. For example, to filter for the Debian user, use the command:

sudo

lsof

-u

debian How to Filter for a Specific File

Suppose you only want to know the process and the user who opened a specific file. To do this, pass the name of the file to lsof:

sudo

lsof

/

bin

/

sleep

The above will only filter for the specific file and return the related information, including the user, process ID, and more.

Wrapping Up

In this simple tutorial, we discussed how to query the system for information about open files using the lsof command in Linux. Here are some additional commands for you to list the content of a directory in the terminal.

John Wachira

John is a technical writer at MTE, when is not busy writing tech tutorials, he is staring at the screen trying to debug code.

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Iphone 13 Cinematic Mode Video Shot On The Street With No Extra Equipment

Cinematic Mode video is one of the headline new features of the iPhone 13. The big question has been what performance would be like in real life. Apple’s own demo was incredibly impressive, but that of course relied on professional lighting and as many takes as were needed to get a great result.

We’ve already had one answer, from the WSJ’s Joanna Stern, who shot a music video in a studio, again with professional lighting and mounting equipment. But a new music video shot with nothing more than the iPhone 13 itself gives a much more realistic idea …

Cinematic Mode is effectively Portrait mode for video, adding artificial blur to the background – but also allowing selective focus, and some AI-driven automatic selection of focus points.

Stern wasn’t very impressed with her own experience.

The software struggles to know where objects begin and end. It’s a lot like the early days of Portrait Mode, but it’s worse because now the blur moves and warps. I shot footage where the software lost parts of noses and fingers, and struggled with items such as a phone or camera.

But while studio conditions give you optimum control, they also increase our expectations.

Videographer Jonathan Morrison took a very different approach when he created a music video for singer Julia Wolf. It was shot on the street using the iPhone 13 Pro – and absolutely nothing else, not even a gimbal.

Went hands on with the iPhone 13 Pro and immediately wanted to test out the camera and cinematic mode. It’s limited to 1080p 30fps but I was surprised to see how sharp it was AND that it retained Dolby Vision.

The result? It’s not perfect, for sure. Some of the artefacts Stern complained about are visible, especially around Wolf’s hair as she turns her head. Then there are the same issues we saw with the early iterations of Portrait mode – look at the gap in her right arm, for example, where the chairs in the background have been left in focus.

Any professional videographer watching it will be cringing at that.

But honestly, for a smartphone video, it really is stunning. I doubt that many of Wolf’s fans will be obsessing about the imperfections in the AI processing. It’s a fantastic example of what can be achieved with a single device and an ordinary location if you have enough talent.

Plus, of course, this is the first generation of the technology. Like Portrait mode, it will improve significantly over time as Apple works on the algorithms.

For me, the most exciting thing about this capability is that it’s going to inspire a new generation of filmmakers, who can begin creating videos with a truly cinematic look using nothing more than their phone. I really can’t wait to see more examples.

And personally, I love the idea of being able to create more cinematic-looking travel videos without having to carry any other kit with me.

Check out the video below – but note that it has explicit lyrics.

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